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MemberJon Giullian

As Head of the IAS Department, I coordinate the work of the department’s seven programs (African, East Asian, West European, Global and International; Middle East; Slavic and Eurasian; and Spain, Portugal, Latin American and Caribbean) within KU Libraries and with other campus units. As Librarian for Slavic and Eurasian studies, I acquire materials from and about Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, and the Caucasus; provide research and instructional services to KU faculty, staff, students, visiting scholars, K-12 community, and the general public; and serve as library liaison to related academic departments and areas studies centers. I also engage in research and professional service and provide support for programs in Global & International Studies and European Studies. 

MemberGabrielle Cornish

Gabrielle Cornish is a PhD candidate in Musicology at the Eastman School of Music. Her research broadly considers music and everyday life in the Soviet Union. In particular, her dissertation traces the intersections between music, technology, and the politics of “socialist modernity” after Stalinism. Her research in Russia has been supported by the Fulbright Program, the Glenn Watkins Traveling Fellowship, and the Cohen-Tucker Dissertation Research Fellowship from the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. For the 2019-2020 academic year, Gabrielle will be supported by a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship as well as an honorary Alvin H. Johnson AMS-50 Fellowship from the American Musicological Society. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in the Journal of Musicology, Sounding Out!Slate, and The Washington Post. She has appeared as a guest to discuss Russian history, culture, and politics on NBC Nightly News, BBC World Service Television, and BBC Radio Newsday. In her free time, she performs Russian-to-English translation, does freelance graphic design, and makes loud (and soft) noises on drums.

MemberGeorge Gilbert

Broadly speaking, my research work has encompassed two major areas to date. The first of these is the radical right in late imperial Russia. This was the subject of my first monograph, titled The Radical Right in Late Imperial Russia: Dreams of a True Fatherland? (Routledge, 2016) The work assessed the changing social dynamics of the populist-nationalist radical right as it emerged in the early twentieth century in Russia. Key concepts examined were national identity, the use of anti-Semitism and the adoption of violence by the major groups assessed. I also considered the civic society projects of the far right and their approach to renewing Russia in the late imperial period, which many of their activists saw as a time of degeneration and decay. This is also something I have explored in research articles. My current research is on martyrdom and martyrology in revolutionary Russia. I am most interested in the wave of martyrdoms on both right and left that emerged in the era of mass violence around the 1905 revolution in Russia, but I will contextualize the project more broadly – cases I have examined span from 1881 to 1917. The project will explore the intersections between these violent, noble deaths that emerged in public life in the late imperial period. I have started the primary research for this, which I hope will form the basis of my second book, and research articles in the future. More recently I have become interested in the history of sport and physical culture in late imperial Russia. I published an article in Slavonic and East European Review on the Sokol movement, and I envisage future research in this area. I have a broad range of teaching experience in European and world history but my primary focus is always the history of modern Russia. My current teaching consists of a number of modules on Russian history from the early nineteenth century to the present day, and a team-taught module on the radical right. I would be pleased to supervise students on aspects of modern Russian history.

MemberJohanna Mellis

I am a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Florida. My dissertation, titled Negotiation Through Sport: Navigating Everyday Life in Socialist Hungary, 1948-1989, examines the changes in policies, social relations, and cultural norms in the elite sport community. More specifically, I examine how the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and mass defection of hundreds of athletes following the Revolution gradually influenced sport leaders and elite athletes that cooperating with one another enabled both groups to achieve their respective goals of gold medals and material prosperity. My research also explores the improving relations between Hungarian sport leaders and the International Olympic Committee, and how their relations impacted policies domestically and within the IOC. In sum, my research is a history of the politics of cooperation during the Cold War, through the lens of elite sport. My research has been awarded numerous prestigious grants, including the Olympic Studies Centre’s PhD Research Grant, the North American Society for sport History Dissertation Travel Grant, and a Fulbright Grant. I have also received several Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to study Hungary. My research consists of archival materials from the National Archives and State Security Services Archives in Hungary, the Olympic Studies Centre’s archival holdings on the IOC in Switzerland, and over thirty oral histories that I have conducted with former top athletes, coaches, and sport leaders.