• This chapter argues that the concept of the gothic corpse can be productively used to analyze Dostoevsky’s The Idiot (1869) through the deployment of two specific imagined corpses in the novel: “The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb” by Hans Holbein the Younger and the murderer’s victim buried under the floorboards of Rogozhin’s house. The author identifies three scenes, each significant for the narrative’s meaning and each focused on the image of the corpse. The author argues that gothic narrative force, stemming from the corpse imagery, informs the overall plot of The Idiot and, more broadly, Dostoevsky’s attempts to incorporate affect into realist representation.