• Crafting a (Written) Science of Surgery: The First European Surgical Texts

    Author(s):
    Monica H. Green (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Subject(s):
    History, Medicine, Surgery, Middle Ages, Manuscripts
    Item Type:
    Blog Post
    Tag(s):
    Constantinus Africanus, Surgical Writings, History of Medicine, Medieval Italy, Medical Education, medieval Latin, Pharmacology, Anesthesia, Monte Cassino, Arabic Medicine
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/0pv6-f106
    Abstract:
    This was an invited blogpost for the now-defunct blog on History of Medicine, REMEDIA. Published in 2015, the blogpost documents the revival and then transformation of written traditions in European surgical writing, at a time when a substantial corpus of new medical works were being absorbed from the Islamic world. The general barrenness of the surgical landscape in early medieval Europe disappeared quite suddenly between the later 11th and the later 12th century when four new Latin surgical texts came into being. One arose out of a continuous written tradition that stretched back to the ancient Greek world, another out of empiricism that captured local Italian practices. The third and fourth show fusions of the learned and the empirical, creating a new, uniquely European tradition of medical writing. The essay is illustrated with five images from medical manuscripts from the period. (Note that the author's email contact has changed: it is now monica.h.green@gmail.com.)
    Notes:
    The blog in which this was original published is defunct.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Online publication    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial

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