• "The Grand Event for Which They Are Born": Life, Death, and Eternity in the Poetry of Ann and Jane Taylor

    Author(s):
    Sharon Smulders (see profile)
    Date:
    2007
    Subject(s):
    Children's literature, Children's poetry, English, Children's literature, English, Christian literature for children, Hymns, English, Death, Women in literature, Taylor, Ann, 1782-1866, Taylor, Jane, 1783-1824, Women poets
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/vp0r-c062
    Abstract:
    Death pervades the juvenile poetry of Ann and Jane Taylor. Despite their commitment to the pedagogy of death, however, a singular lack of spiritual content or religious consolation distinguishes their first and, in many ways, their most famous works, Original Poems for Infant Minds (1804-1805) and Rhymes for the Nursery (1806). At the same time, their later volumes, Hymns for Infant Minds (1810) and Original Hymns for Sunday Schools (1812), witness a significant teleological shift in orientation from behaviour to belief, from body to soul, and from the here to the hereafter. By so resituating themselves as female hymnists and popular theologians, the Taylor sisters not only subordinate juvenile poetry to the imperatives of evangelical mission but also give shape to nineteenth-century notions of death, damnation, and divinity.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    5 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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