• Non-hegemonic or ‘other’ voices in the urban design process: Advocacy Planning and Civil Rights Movement in the United States in the late 1960s

    Author(s):
    Marianna Charitonidou (see profile)
    Date:
    2023
    Item Type:
    Abstract
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/8a29-yh50
    Abstract:
    The paper takes as its point of departure advocacy planning approaches' consideration that urban renewal is incompatible with equitable socially effective urban planning strategies. It focuses on analyzing the activities of the Architects' Renewal Committee in Harlem (ARCH), which was the first organization solely devoted to advocacy planning in the United States. In parallel, it explains how the critiques of urban renewal in the late 1960s in the NorthEastern American context is related to the emergence of groups that aimed to struggle for the civil rights of African Americans. It also investigates how ARCH provided technical and design advice to communities who could otherwise not afford it, on the one hand, and how it contributed democratization of urban planning, on the other. It pays special attention to ARCH's program entitled "Architecture in the Neighborhoods" (1970), which aimed to recruit local black youth to become architects, and compares the strategies of ARCH with those of other groups that also struggled over the rights of minorities and the democratization of urban planning, such as The Architects' Resistance (TAR), National Organization of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS), Black Workshop, and City Planning Forum. TAR was a group formed in 1968 by architecture students from Columbia University's GSAPP, MIT's Department of Architecture, and Yale School of Architecture and was "concerned about the social responsibility of architects and the framework within which architecture is practiced." The objective of the paper is to present how the aforementioned groups emerged within the context of the struggles for civil rights and how they explored new concepts, roles and tools for participation and community design, reshaping urban planning models in order to respond to the call for a more democratic society.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Conference proceeding    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    12 months ago
    License:
    Attribution

    Downloads

    Item Name: pdf marianna_charitonidou_non_hegemonic_or_o.pdf
      Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 22