• "Can the Biopic Subjects Speak? Disembodied Voices in The King's Speech and The Theory of Everything." A Companion to the Biopic, ed. Deborah Cartmell and Ashley D. Polasek (Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2020), 269-282

    Author(s):
    Alexa Alice Joubin (see profile)
    Date:
    2020
    Group(s):
    GS Drama and Performance, LLC Shakespeare, MS Screen Arts and Culture
    Subject(s):
    Disability studies, Biopolitics, Adaptation, Film studies, Shakespeare, Gender studies
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    affect theory, Cultural appropriation
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/wnes-7772
    Abstract:
    The adaptations of King George VI's and Stephen Hawking's life stories show their uneasy relationship to the "troubled-white-male-genius" genre and to the vocal embodiment of their subjects who lose and gain a voice through therapy, technology, and their will to live a full life. The films carefully skirt the edges of public disgust and pity of differently abled bodies: how the stuttering King George VI struggles to find his voice and adapt to the then emerging and increasingly important radio broadcasting technology; and how the physicist Stephen Hawking speaks through a speech synthesizer.
    Notes:
    https://www.wiley.com/en-us/A+Companion+to+the+Biopic-p-9781119554813
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
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