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MemberMark Konecny

Dr. Mark Konecny is the Scholarly Communications and Digital Publishing Strategist at the University of Cincinnati. He has been involved in the development of digital media in teaching Humanities for the past 15 years with many disciplines across the curriculum compiling digital curriculum and materials for distance learning in the Humanities: Art History, International Relations, Political Science, Literature, Theater, and Communications, and he has created digital platforms and content for dissemination of rare materials from archive and rare book repositories as well as promotion of digital scholarship in the Humanities. He manages and administers a special collection and research institute that deals with digital content: writing grants, fundraising, supervision, budgeting and procurement and works with issues of digital technology and its application in academic projects and implement technology in the classroom and the interface between the library and academic departments.
He is an editor of the journal Experiment, a scholarly art history journal. In addition to duties as a curator and art historian specializing in Modern Art and the Avant-Garde, he oversaw the transition of the journal from a university published journal to one published and distributed by a major European firm, Brill Publishers, soliciting manuscripts, editing prose, proofreading, revising, and placing illustrations. He has experience negotiating copyright and image right issues. He has worked on several multiyear projects involving faculty and museum professionals from many disciplines from many international universities.

MemberJon Giullian

As Head of the IAS Department, I coordinate the work of the department’s seven programs (African, East Asian, West European, Global and International; Middle East; Slavic and Eurasian; and Spain, Portugal, Latin American and Caribbean) within KU Libraries and with other campus units. As Librarian for Slavic and Eurasian studies, I acquire materials from and about Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, and the Caucasus; provide research and instructional services to KU faculty, staff, students, visiting scholars, K-12 community, and the general public; and serve as library liaison to related academic departments and areas studies centers. I also engage in research and professional service and provide support for programs in Global & International Studies and European Studies. 

MemberJohanna Mellis

I am a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Florida. My dissertation, titled Negotiation Through Sport: Navigating Everyday Life in Socialist Hungary, 1948-1989, examines the changes in policies, social relations, and cultural norms in the elite sport community. More specifically, I examine how the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and mass defection of hundreds of athletes following the Revolution gradually influenced sport leaders and elite athletes that cooperating with one another enabled both groups to achieve their respective goals of gold medals and material prosperity. My research also explores the improving relations between Hungarian sport leaders and the International Olympic Committee, and how their relations impacted policies domestically and within the IOC. In sum, my research is a history of the politics of cooperation during the Cold War, through the lens of elite sport. My research has been awarded numerous prestigious grants, including the Olympic Studies Centre’s PhD Research Grant, the North American Society for sport History Dissertation Travel Grant, and a Fulbright Grant. I have also received several Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to study Hungary. My research consists of archival materials from the National Archives and State Security Services Archives in Hungary, the Olympic Studies Centre’s archival holdings on the IOC in Switzerland, and over thirty oral histories that I have conducted with former top athletes, coaches, and sport leaders.

MemberGabrielle Cornish

Gabrielle Cornish is a PhD candidate in Musicology at the Eastman School of Music. Her research broadly considers music and everyday life in the Soviet Union. In particular, her dissertation traces the intersections between music, technology, and the politics of “socialist modernity” after Stalinism. Her research in Russia has been supported by the Fulbright Program, the Glenn Watkins Traveling Fellowship, and the Cohen-Tucker Dissertation Research Fellowship from the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. For the 2019-2020 academic year, Gabrielle will be supported by a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship as well as an honorary Alvin H. Johnson AMS-50 Fellowship from the American Musicological Society. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in the Journal of Musicology, Sounding Out!Slate, and The Washington Post. She has appeared as a guest to discuss Russian history, culture, and politics on NBC Nightly News, BBC World Service Television, and BBC Radio Newsday. In her free time, she performs Russian-to-English translation, does freelance graphic design, and makes loud (and soft) noises on drums.