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MemberAmber Nickell

…68-1978,” Traversea: Journal of Transatlantic History (2013):  4-16.
Book Reviews
Amber Nickell, review of The Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine: An Anatomy of the Holodomor by Stanislav Kulchytsky, Canadian Slavonic Papers 61:4, 457-…

Amber N. Nickell is a Ph.D. Candidate at Purdue University. Her primary research and teaching field is “Modern Central and Eastern European History”; however, she completed minor preliminary exam fields in “Transnational Germany” and “Russian Imperial Borderlands.”  She earned a Master’s degree in American history (2013) and a Bachelor’s degree in European history (2011) from the University of Northern Colorado. She has presented her work at numerous local, national, and international conferences, workshops, and symposia and received a number of awards for her writing, research, service, and teaching. Additionally, she is a recipient of several research grants and fellowships, including the 2016 Auschwitz Jewish Center Fellowship, Title VIII Grants, and most recently the Fulbright Fellowship (Ukraine). Amber’s training as a scholar of both Europe and the United States enables her to conduct research and teach across these fields. Her methodologies transcend the national, focusing on transnational phenomena, including migration, diaspora, deportation, ethnic cleansing, genocide, human rights, and internationalism. Her command of the spatial humanities augments these strengths. Amber’s most recent publication, “Time to Show the Kremlin America’s Full House: The Committee for Human Rights in the Soviet Union, Rabbi Gedalyah Engel, and their Refusnik Adoptees, 1977-1992,” which appeared in The Transnational Yearbook, Volume 1 (Fairleigh Dickenson, 2018), serves as one example. For more details, see: https://rowman.com/isbn/9781683930037/yearbook-of-transnational-history-(2018)-volume-1 Amber’s current project, tentatively titled “Brotherlands to Bloodlands: Ethnic Germans and Jews in Southern Ukraine, Late Tsarist to Postwar” examines coexistence and confluence between the two groups in territories which now fall in Southern Ukraine and Moldova. She considers the astounding territorial, political, and demographic shifts in the region and ponders their impact on intergroup relationships. In doing so, she illuminates historical processes that transformed interactions between ethnic Germans and their Jewish neighbors from neighborly to murderous.