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MemberMark Konecny

Dr. Mark Konecny is the Scholarly Communications and Digital Publishing Strategist at the University of Cincinnati. He has been involved in the development of digital media in teaching Humanities for the past 15 years with many disciplines across the curriculum compiling digital curriculum and materials for distance learning in the Humanities: Art History, International Relations, Political Science, Literature, Theater, and Communications, and he has created digital platforms and content for dissemination of rare materials from archive and rare book repositories as well as promotion of digital scholarship in the Humanities. He manages and administers a special collection and research institute that deals with digital content: writing grants, fundraising, supervision, budgeting and procurement and works with issues of digital technology and its application in academic projects and implement technology in the classroom and the interface between the library and academic departments.
He is an editor of the journal Experiment, a scholarly art history journal. In addition to duties as a curator and art historian specializing in Modern Art and the Avant-Garde, he oversaw the transition of the journal from a university published journal to one published and distributed by a major European firm, Brill Publishers, soliciting manuscripts, editing prose, proofreading, revising, and placing illustrations. He has experience negotiating copyright and image right issues. He has worked on several multiyear projects involving faculty and museum professionals from many disciplines from many international universities.

MemberKatherine Bowers

…20 (virtual)
ASEEES, Washington DC, Nov 2020 (virtual)
Slavic Department Speaker Series, U of Toronto, Nov 2020 (virtual)
Russian Studies Seminar Series, UCL-SSEES, Dec 2020 (virtual)
MLA, Toronto, Jan 2021 (virtual)
Children’s Book Center, U Illinois, Mar 2021 (virtual)
Anglo-Russian Research Network, Pushkin House/U Exeter, May 2021 (virtual)
Digital Humanities Summer Institute, U Victoria, Jun 2021
ICCEES World Congress, Montréal, Aug 2021 (virtual)…
… Karamazov, the blog of the North American Dostoevsky Society. With Kate Holland I am co-editing working on two collaborative projects with Kate Holland (Toronto): Dostoevsky at 200: The Novel in Modernity (University of Toronto Press, forthcoming), an edited volume to mark Dostoevsky’s bicentenary in 2021, and Digital Dostoevsky, a SSHRC-funded digital humanities project investigating Dostoevsky’s corpus.

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I am an Associate Professor of Slavic Studies in the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada and the Vice-President of the North American Dostoevsky Society. I specialize in Russian literature and culture of the long nineteenth century, and teach classes about Russian, Slavic and comparative literature and culture. More information about my research and activities can be found on my institutional profile and my personal website.

MemberFaith Hillis

I am an historian of modern Europe and Russia, with a special interest in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century politics, culture, and ideas. My work explores how Russia’s peculiar political institutions—and its status as a multiethnic empire—shaped public opinion and political cultures. It also interrogates Russia’s relationship with the outside world, asking where the Russian experience belongs in the broader context of European and global history. In addition, I am interested in the theory and practice of the digital humanities. My first book, Children of Rus’: Right-Bank Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation, was published by Cornell University Press in 2013. ( See http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100088630). Children of Rus’ argues that it was on the extreme periphery of the tsarist empire—a region that today is located at the very center of the independent nation of Ukraine—that Russian nationalism first took shape and assumed its most potent form. The book reconstructs how nineteenth-century provincial intellectuals came to see local folk customs as the purest manifestation of an ancient nation that unified all the Orthodox East Slavs, and how they successfully propagated their ideas across the empire through lobbying and mass political mobilization. Rather than documenting the advance of “national awakenings” on the imperial periphery, Children of Rus’ highlights the flexibility and contingency of national collectives; it reveals the surprising role that men whom we today would identify as ethnic Ukrainians played in the creation of Russian nationalism as well as the unwitting contributions that Russian nationalists made to other nation-building projects that would ultimately challenge the primacy of their movement. In addition, Children of Rus’ offers a bold reconceptualization of state-society relations under tsarism, showing how residents of a diverse and contested peripheral region managed to shape political ideas and identities across Russia—and even beyond its borders. In the book that I am currently researching, Europe’s Russian Colonies: Politics, Community, and Modernity across Borders, my abiding interest in politics, culture, and ideas takes a new direction. A study of the diverse yet close-knit settlements of tsarist émigrés that sprung up in western Europe’s large cities, university towns, and spa resorts over the long nineteenth century, this book provides the first synthetic history of pre-1917 traffic between Russia and Europe. Placing familiar themes in imperial history in an international context, it treats Europe’s “Russian colonies” as incubators of new ideas, cultures, and identities that ultimately traveled back to Russia via literature, correspondence, and return migration. Europe’s Russian Colonies also argues that these unique urban communities shaped the larger societies in which they were located in consequential ways. The “Russian colonies” and their residents played important roles in the articulation of liberal dreams of universalism and freedom. Yet by the late nineteenth century, as they became breeding grounds for radical ideas on both the left and the right, they began to present new challenges to western Europe’s liberal-parliamentary order. My current research is enriched by technology, and I am interested in thinking through how historians can use digital tools to open new avenues for exploration and to communicate their findings to other scholars and the general public. I am particularly interested in using geo-spatial analysis to analyze flows of people, ideas, and commodities over time and across space. For examples of my (ongoing) work in digital mapping, see my Europe’s Russian Colonies (http://worldmap.harvard.edu/maps/6120) and  Publishing the Russian Empire Abroad (https://public.tableau.com/profile/publish/PublishingtheRussianEmpireAbroad/Languagebycity#!/publish-confirm) maps. I have held research fellowships at Columbia University’s Harriman Institute and at Harvard University’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, and have been awarded grants from ACLS, IREX, Fulbright-Hays, and NCEEER, among others.

MemberAmber Nickell

…php?id=53733&fbclid=IwAR0HRVp0_rzRCzPKyyZ8YvVMG2WuaNpcch0sYhu9OV5Oc6TxWPKO1m0VEyY.
Amber Nickell, review of Stepmother Russia, Foster Mother America: Identity Transitions in the New Odessa Jewish Commune, Odessa, Oregon, New York, 1881-1891 by Theodore H. Friedgut, Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies 34, no. 1 (Fall 2015): 136-138.
Digital Humanities
Amber Nickell, “‘The Evil Itself… Descended on the Earth’: Mapping Manmade Famines and Ethnic Germans in the Soviet Union, 1921 and 1932-33,” Purdue University Electronic Publications, 2015. (Published Conference Poster) http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1062andcontext=purduegisday….

Amber N. Nickell is a Ph.D. Candidate at Purdue University. Her primary research and teaching field is “Modern Central and Eastern European History”; however, she completed minor preliminary exam fields in “Transnational Germany” and “Russian Imperial Borderlands.”  She earned a Master’s degree in American history (2013) and a Bachelor’s degree in European history (2011) from the University of Northern Colorado. She has presented her work at numerous local, national, and international conferences, workshops, and symposia and received a number of awards for her writing, research, service, and teaching. Additionally, she is a recipient of several research grants and fellowships, including the 2016 Auschwitz Jewish Center Fellowship, Title VIII Grants, and most recently the Fulbright Fellowship (Ukraine). Amber’s training as a scholar of both Europe and the United States enables her to conduct research and teach across these fields. Her methodologies transcend the national, focusing on transnational phenomena, including migration, diaspora, deportation, ethnic cleansing, genocide, human rights, and internationalism. Her command of the spatial humanities augments these strengths. Amber’s most recent publication, “Time to Show the Kremlin America’s Full House: The Committee for Human Rights in the Soviet Union, Rabbi Gedalyah Engel, and their Refusnik Adoptees, 1977-1992,” which appeared in The Transnational Yearbook, Volume 1 (Fairleigh Dickenson, 2018), serves as one example. For more details, see: https://rowman.com/isbn/9781683930037/yearbook-of-transnational-history-(2018)-volume-1 Amber’s current project, tentatively titled “Brotherlands to Bloodlands: Ethnic Germans and Jews in Southern Ukraine, Late Tsarist to Postwar” examines coexistence and confluence between the two groups in territories which now fall in Southern Ukraine and Moldova. She considers the astounding territorial, political, and demographic shifts in the region and ponders their impact on intergroup relationships. In doing so, she illuminates historical processes that transformed interactions between ethnic Germans and their Jewish neighbors from neighborly to murderous.

MemberChristine Jacobson

…Ongoing Digital Humanities Project: Working Women of the East: Uncovering Soviet Attitudes toward Women in the New Multi-Ethnic Empire.

1917 Open Access Research Guide: A research guide for undergraduates studying the Russian revolution…

I am the Assistant Curator of Modern Books and Manuscripts at Harvard’s Houghton Library. I help develop and steward our collections from 1800 to the present day, teach classes, provide advanced reference services, curate exhibitions, and give tours for visitors.