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MemberConnor Doak

I have been a lecturer in Russian at the University of Bristol since 2013. I  am currently serving as Head of Subject in the Department of Russian & Czech. In broad terms, my research explores the relationship between literature and life, art and society, language and power. My area of specialization is Russian literature, culture and society from the Romantic period to the present day. I have a particular interest in cultural manifestations of gender and sexuality, especially the treatment of masculinity in experimental texts in literature and film. I have published on queer aspects of Dostoevsky’s novels, on fatherhood in Chekhov’s short stories, and contested national identities and histories in Pushkin and Byron’s narrative poems. I am currently working on a monograph on masculinity and power in the work of Vladimir Maiakovskii. The book deconstructs the popular image of Maiakovskii as a ‘manly’ poet, a myth propagated not only by the writer himself, but by generations of critics in both Russia and the West, seduced by his work, and in possession of a powerful, but unarticulated and uncritical, gender essentialism. The book goes beyond the cliché of Maiakovskii as a manly poet, showing how he uses verse to negotiate the shifting terrain of masculinity in revolutionary Russia and the early Soviet period. My teaching covers a broad range of topics and themes in Russian literature and culture from 1800 to the present, with occasional forays into earlier periods. At upper levels, my teaching includes research-based classes such as ‘Gender in 20C and 21C Russia’, ‘Writing Revolution: Russian Literature 1910-1940’, and ‘Russia and the World since 1991’. My approach to teaching is explicitly interdisciplinary and comparative, and I regularly contribute to comparative literature and culture teaching both at undergraduate and graduate level. I also have experience teaching Russian language at all levels.

MemberDaniel W. Pratt

I’m interested in Central and Eastern European literature, culture, film, and intellectual history, from Germany to Russia. My current research focuses on the intersection of literature, philosophy, narrative, and aesthetics from the 18th century to the present day. I work primarily on the 20th and 21st centuries, although I have a continuing interest in the 19th century as well (particularly Romanticism and the development of narratological paradigms). I am currently finishing a book project on constructing non-narrative temporalities in Central Europe. I argue that Central European authors rejected narrative constructions of time, opting instead for forms of episodes, collage, and spectral traces to develop alternative temporal constructions. My next project takes me to the 1980s in Central Europe where the second generation of dissidents rejected not only the socialist regimes but also the opposition of the previous generation.

MemberMargaret Samu

Margaret Samu works on 18th- and 19th-century European art and design with a special interest in the intersection between Russian and Western cultures. She earned her Ph.D. at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts after receiving her Bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College in Art History and French. Her work has been published internationally, in journals such as Искусствознание, Nineteenth-Century Studies, and Эксперимент/Experiment, as well as a volume she co-edited, From Realism to the Silver Age (Northern Illinois University Press, 2014). She has presented lectures and conference papers on her work in Russia, England, the United States, and Canada, and has received grants from the Mellon Foundation, the Fulbright Program, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Library of Congress, among other institutions. Dr. Samu is currently working on a book-length project titled Russian Venus. She served as president of the Society of Historians of East European, Eurasian, and Russian Art and Architecture (SHERA) from 2013 until 2015.

MemberSusan Smith-Peter

Susan Smith-Peter works on Russian history beyond the two capitals of Moscow and St. Petersburg.  Beginning with a study of identity in the provinces of European (or central) Russia, she has branched out to investigate the regional identity of the Russian North and Siberia as well.  Her book, Imagining Russian Regions: Subnational Identity and Civil Society in Nineteenth-Century Russia, was published with Brill in 2018.

MemberBrittany R. Roberts

Brittany Roberts earned her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from University of California, Riverside. Her work focuses on 20th- and 21st-century Russian and Anglophone literature and cinema, particularly speculative fiction and the environmental humanities. She is currently preparing her first book, which undertakes a comparative analysis of Russian and Anglophone horror literature and cinema focusing on depictions of humans, animals, the environment, and the ecological and metaphysical dynamics that link them. Brittany has published articles and chapters in The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies, The Spaces and Places of Horror, Plants in Science Fiction: Speculative Vegetation, and the forthcoming collection Fear and Nature: Ecohorror Studies in the Anthropocene. She is especially interested in how horror and other speculative fiction genres disrupt the human-nonhuman binary and in how speculative fiction reconsiders, challenges, and reconceives of our relations with other species.

MemberChristopher Campo-Bowen

Christopher Campo-Bowen is an Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow in the Department of Music at the NYU Faculty of Arts and Science. He completed his Ph.D. in musicology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He holds a B.A. in Music with honors in conducting from Stanford University and an M.M. in Orchestral Conducting from The Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. He is also active as a viola player, singer, conductor, and translator. Christopher’s research focuses on music in the Habsburg Monarchy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, especially on the relationships between music, ethnicity, gender, and empire. He is particularly interested in the music of the composers Bedřich Smetana, Antonín Dvořák, and Leoš Janáček and how conceptions of ruralness in Czech opera structured notions of subjectivity and identity. His current project investigates the institutional and imperial relationships between Prague and Vienna in the context of operatic performance and exhibition culture. He has published articles in the journals Nineteenth-Century Music and Cambridge Opera Journal and presented at various national and international conferences, including the annual meeting of the American Musicological Society, the Council for European Studies annual conference, the North American Conference on Nineteenth Century Music, and the Branding “Western Music” conference hosted at the Universität Bern. Christopher received a Fulbright grant for the Czech Republic to perform dissertation research; he has also held a Howard Mayer Brown Fellowship from the American Musicological Society and was the recipient of a Council for European Studies Mellon Dissertation Completion Grant.

MemberKatherine Bowers

I am an Associate Professor of Slavic Studies in the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada and the Vice-President of the North American Dostoevsky Society. I specialize in Russian literature and culture of the long nineteenth century, and teach classes about Russian, Slavic and comparative literature and culture. More information about my research and activities can be found on my institutional profile and my personal website.